In case you haven’t heard, Ohio Medical Marijuana dispensaries are now open, allowing patients and caregivers to purchase legal medical marijuana. This is a historic step as more dispensaries continue to open across the state and more products become available to qualifying patients. In this article, we will cover Ohio MMJ dispensaries, what to bring, and the rules that regulate purchasing Ohio Medical Marijuana.

If you have questions regarding medical marijuana, if it is right for you, and how to obtain your Ohio MMJ card, we can help! You can find a certified Ohio MMJ Doctor through us here (https://docmj.com/ohio/). We also offer a quick and easy eligibility survey to see if you pre-qualify for an Ohio medical marijuana recommendation here (https://docmj.com/ohio/eligibility-survey/).

Ohio Dispensaries

As of March 28th, 2019, there are thirteen medical marijuana dispensaries with certificates of operation from the OMMCP. The official list can be found here (https://www.medicalmarijuana.ohio.gov/Documents/Dispensaries/Dispensaries%20with%20Certificates%20of%20Operation/Ohio%20Medical%20Marijuana%20Dispensaries%20with%20Certificates%20of%20Operation.pdf).

Name Address County
Clubhouse Dispensary 709 Sugar Ln., Elyria Lorain
Terrasana Labs 10500 Antenucci Rd., Suite 200, Garfield Heights Cuyahoga
The Botanist 3840 Greentree Ave. SW, Canton Stark
FRX Health 1865 Dresden Ave., East Liverpool Columbiana
The Botanist 30133 Euclid Ave., Wickliffe Lake
gLeaf Medical Cannabis 2932 Youngstown Rd. SE, Warren Trumbull
Terrasana Labs 1800 E State St, Fremont Sandusky
The Forest Sandusky, LLC 1651 Tiffin Ave., Sandusky Erie
Buckeye Botanicals LLC 3 Acy Ave., Jackson Jackson
Terrasana Labs 656 Grandview Ave., Columbus Franklin
Ohio Cannabis Company 23024 County Road 621, Ste. 1, Coshocton Coshocton
CY+ 180 Main St., Wintersville Jefferson
Ohio Valley Natural Relief LLC 840 Canton Rd., Wintersville Jefferson

 

A list of all current and future dispensary locations can be found through DocMJ here (https://docmj.com/ohio/dispensaries/).

As a patient or caregiver visiting a dispensary, it is important to know what to bring. After receiving a recommendation through a certified Ohio medical marijuana physician, the patient (and caregiver if applicable) must be signed up through the patient registry. The activation fee must be paid before completing registration, and the medical marijuana card can then be downloaded. A copy of the card is not provided by the state, so the patient/caregiver must print out a hard copy or have access to it via a mobile device.

When at the dispensary, the patient or caregiver must have both the for of ID used at the physician’s office and the medical marijuana registry card. The dispensary workers will then help find the type and dosage for the patient. Due to the recency of the medical marijuana program at the time of writing, there may be shortages of certain products. This is expected to be fixed as the program matures.

What You Can Buy

The available forms of medical marijuana currently are: oils, tinctures, plant material, edibles and patches. Smoking of medical marijuana is not allowed, but vaporization of dried marijuana is. Additional forms or methods of administration of medical marijuana may be approved by the Board of Pharmacy and all petitions can be submitted here (https://www.medicalmarijuana.ohio.gov/AddFormMethod).

The required information to petition a new form or method of application is as follows: the petitioner’s information (name, address, email, phone number), the requested form or method of administration, the anticipated benefits of the proposed form or method of administration, the reported adverse effects of the proposed form or method of administration, how accepted by the medical community the for or method of administration is, and expert support of the method of administration or form.

As of writing, dispensaries had only been able to sell the dried flower of marijuana. Though other products were allowed, there had not been a supply. Recently, tinctures of cannabis extracts have gone on sale, and new products should be coming soon. Prices are also expected to fall as more supply is produced.

Just as dispensing of medical marijuana is regulated, so is the cultivation. Overseen by the Ohio Department of Commerce, cultivators of marijuana are required to follow many rules pertaining to how they can grow and label their products. These practices help ensure that the patients are getting the most consistent experience.

Level one and level two licenses for cultivation have been awarded to twelve applicants each, and all are required to produce a steady supply of medical marijuana for the state. The cultivators are monitored and can use only approved pesticides, fertilizers, and other chemicals. The staff applying the chemicals must also adhere to strict standards and the applicable records must be kept for at least five years.

All material sent from the cultivator to the processor must be in a tamper-evident, light-resistant, clearly labeled container. The label must show a laboratory analysis of all active ingredients and percentage by weight of main cannabinoids.

The processing of medical marijuana is also very closely monitored. The processors must follow strict codes and requirements as overseen by Ohio Department of Commerce. They are required to list allergens and expiration dates on the outside of all products and make the intended method of ingestion as clear as possible.

As the program continues to grow, so will the supply and ease of access to medical marijuana. It is important to remember to bring a copy of your medical marijuana card and the ID used to register the physician’s office to the dispensary. Although only dried flower bud and tinctures are currently available for purchase, the addition of edibles, oils, and patches are expected to arrive soon. For more information, visit the official OMMCP website here (https://www.medicalmarijuana.ohio.gov/default). For the official rules over the sale, cultivation, and processing of marijuana, visit the Ohio Administrative Code website here (http://codes.ohio.gov/oac/).